To homework or not to homework?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by horned_Frog89, Jun 15, 2017.

  1. Teacherhere

    Teacherhere Rookie

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    Jun 17, 2017

    Public school. However, I am considering going to teach at a military boarding school.
     
  2. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Jun 18, 2017 at 9:20 AM

    What skills do you think you developed as a result of so much homework and a job by age 9 that other people didn't? Do you think that other people may have developed a different, equally valuable set of skills, perhaps skills that include the ability to connect and empathize with others, to clearly defend a position without coming across as angry and argumentative, or to bloom where you are planted, i.e. be successful under any circumstances even if not ideal?
     
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  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Jun 18, 2017 at 9:24 AM

    [​IMG]
     
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  4. mathmagic

    mathmagic Connoisseur

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    Jun 18, 2017 at 11:55 AM

    Interestingly, Albert Einstein - which I think we could agree is "relatively" good at math - was highly against the idea of rote learning (homework, for the most part, tends to be rote learning). And look at how many people have been highly successful, even though they perhaps lacked the "fortitude" to finish high school or college.

    There isn't one path to success and learning, which you seem to be implying.
     
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  5. mrsf70

    mrsf70 Rookie

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    Jun 19, 2017 at 6:57 AM

    We on the other hand, are hindered by our diverse society. We play the political correct card and don't want to offend anyone. Our education system is built on "feel good" measures rather than what is needed to succeed.

    Our diverse society is what makes us the United States of America. If you are not of Native American heritage, then you are an "immigrant" contributing to the diversity here. Diversity is not a hindrance; diversity is beautiful.

    I have taught in many capacities in my career: Catholic school, inner-city, low SES public middle school, fine arts magnet public school, and now a mid-range public middle school. I can tell you success is defined very differently by the people in each of those demographics. I believe the toughest issue facing education today is poverty. Until that is remedied and those needs are met, education is not a priority for those affected.

    The second issue I see the most problem with is our antiquated system of "school" and the ideas associated with it. The teacher is no longer the great and powerful holder of information. Students have access to a never-ending amount of facts and figures at their fingertips. Education must change and teach how to interpret, analyze, prioritize and utilize the information at their disposal to contribute in a global society.

    Homework does not teach responsibility. It demonstrates who has a solid enough family life to be able to complete school work at home. After 8 hours at school, why should a student continue another 2-3 hours at home? If class time is used as active learning time with engaging, relevant material, homework is not necessary.
     
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  6. Backroads

    Backroads Connoisseur

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    Jun 19, 2017 at 10:29 AM

    While I won't argue that there aren't benefits the more homogeneous societies have (hey, it works for them), the U.S. has had a great past century and is still arguably holding its own just as well despite or maybe because of diversity. I don't think we've been hindered in anything.
     
  7. GPC0321

    GPC0321 Companion

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    Jun 19, 2017 at 3:07 PM

    This is actually very true, and until I read your post, I hadn't even thought about it. You're exactly right. Kids don't need to get information from us. They need to get the skills necessary to use the information that is already there for them. And goodness knows, with wide range of information (both good and bad, true and false) they can access at any moment, teaching them to THINK is probably more critical than ever.
     
  8. kellzy

    kellzy Companion

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    Jun 20, 2017 at 9:02 PM

    I assign it because I know that there are parents who want their kids to have homework. I don't have an requirements on actually finishing the homework because I know in many cases it won't happen.
    Keeps everyone happy.
     
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  9. otterpop

    otterpop Fanatic

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    Jun 21, 2017 at 1:16 AM

    In previous years, homework held more weight in my grading. This past year I reduced the point value. A kid who did decent on tests and did nearly no homework could pass with a low c or high d. In my class, I had one who did that. Just one though.

    When kids don't do their homework, I talk to them about it and often send home an email to let parents know. I also give them a zero. But, it's no stress on me. If they don't do it, that's on them. (That said, we have a supportive parent community and most of the time, homework gets done.)
     

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